Utilizing Social Media as a Customer Service tool

The amazing feature that Twitter offers consumers is that they are able to instantly and directly communicate with their favorite, or even least favorite, companies. This becomes a tricky task for companies, where they need to monitor all incoming tweets. The good and the bad. Replying to consumers tweets exemplifies great customer service because it shows that you are listening to your audience and personalizing your responses, instead of your consumers receiving the same tweet that everyone else gets or listening to an automated robot on the telephone.

Two companies that demonstrate great customer service via Twitter are Dell and Chipotle. Despite me being a Mac owner, I have no hate towards Dell. If you are a Dell owner, you can tweet in your order for a new Dell computer or even troubleshooting problems. The way Chipotle uses Twitter always amazes me. They respond to every tweet that comes into their official account within an hour or two. The Twitter replies are personalized and are signed by the employee that responded. I have personally tweeted to Chipotle and have even had conversations back and forth with the employees. These Twitter examples show great customer service because they are making personalized connections with their consumers, which will make a lasting impression. Additionally, customer service via Twitter will create a more sustainable revenue stream because consumers will become brand loyal through their personal connections.

Check out this article I found on AM Online about how a large percentage of consumers in Britain are using social media to communicate with companies. Unfortunately for these companies in Britain, they are not paying attention to their incoming tweets, which is damaging their brand image and causing them to lose business!

Let me know what you think! Leave a comment down below!

Over a quarter (26%) of Britons are complaining more now they can use social media to communicate with companies – but the majority of organisations are not listening.

Of the complaints made, 17.5% are left unanswered and 83% of those who have complained are unhappy with the response they received when they do get one.

According to the 2012 Eptica Social Customer Service Study, which surveyed 1,000 consumers across the UK on their attitudes to using social media for customer service, retailers received the most complaints (21%) followed by banks (19%).

When asked why they used social media to complain, nearly a quarter (22%) of people said they believed they would receive a quicker response. The research found that companies are ignoring simple questions as well as complaints – four out of five consumers (81%) didn’t get an acceptable answer to their questions asked on social media.

Dee Roche, Eptica global marketing director, said: “Customers are embracing social media for customer service – but the vast majority of companies are deaf to what they are saying.

“Our research uncovered a real desire by consumers to use the speed and immediacy of social media to interact with companies only to see their requests shockingly ignored. Not answering basic questions is essentially slamming the shop door in the face of potential customers. Social media provides a megaphone through which complaints aired by unhappy customers can quickly escalate. Companies need to put in place a proper strategy for social customer service, before consumers vote with their feet.”

When asked who should be responsible for social customer service, consumers overwhelming selected dedicated customer service departments (68%).

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